Tale Of The Tape
The rule of wrapping is to apply the bandage toward the inside of the leg, wrapping from the front of the leg to the back. This is commonly referred to as "tendons inside," meaning the bandage is oriented so the direction of the pull on the bandage covers the tendons from outside the leg to inside the leg. To accomplish this, start the wrap on the inside of the cannon bone and move the bandage forward around the front of the leg then to the back of the leg, covering the tendons from the outside to the inside. If you start the bandage on the inside of the cannon bone and instead direct the wrap toward the back of the leg, you are covering the tendons from the inside of the leg to the outside ("tendons out"). The key to good wrapping is not really direction, but proper tension which is easier to accomplish when wrapping "tendons inside."

Tension should be snug, but not restrictive to blood flow. A wrap should be supportive to the fetlock and tight enough to keep the bandage from falling down. This means putting slightly more evenly applied tension around the fetlock and easing up a bit as you wrap toward the top of the leg. The wrap should end at the top of the leg and you should be able to easily slip a finger into the top of the bandage. The bottom of the wrap should be a little snugger for support. The wrap should be snug, but not too tight. The skin should be able to move under the bandage.

During an injury to one leg, wrapping both legs is a common practice to eliminate opposing (non injured) leg compensation.

A wrap that is applied improperly can cause pressure sores or damage to the tendons.
This article is printed here with permission from Horse Illustrated, May 2003. Visit www.horseillustratedmagazine.com